Are the Turks family-oriented

Migration - Demography

Tanjev Schultz

To person

M.A. (USA), M.A .; born 1974; research assistant at the University of Bremen.

Address: University of Bremen, Faculty 8, Institute for Intercultural and International Studies, Postfach 33 04 40, 28359 Bremen.
e-mail: [email protected]

Publication including: (together with R. Sackmann and K. Prümm) Collective identity of Turkish migrants in Germany ?, InIIS workbook, No. 20, Bremen 2000.

Rosemarie Sackmann

To person

Dr. rer. soc. born 1956; Assistant at the University of Bremen, Institute for Sociology and Institute for Political Science.

Address: University of Bremen, Faculty 8, Institute for Intercultural and International Studies, Postfach 33 04 40, 28334 Bremen.
e-mail: [email protected]

Publication including: Collective identity, assimilation and integration, InIIS workbook, No. 20, Bremen 2000.

What is the meaning of collective identity with regard to Turkish migrants in Germany ?. On the basis of detailed interviews, signs of a differentiated collective identity of Turkish migrants are reported.

introduction

When the integration of Turkish immigrants, their children and grandchildren is discussed, one of the questions that arises is whether and how this population group sees itself as a special community within society. However, this question about a collective identity of Turkish migrants easily provokes misunderstandings. Because it seems obvious that the social background, way of life, worldview and values ​​of Turkish migrants are diverse and different. Aren't many public discussions suffering from the fact that they lump this section of the population too quickly and take insufficient notice of their heterogeneity? But it would certainly be just as premature to conclude from this that migrant communities and collective identities are altogether useless or even purely ideological constructions. The social reality generally consists not only of individuals, but also of various collectives to which individuals more or less consciously belong and which in some cases have a considerable meaning for the life and self-image of their members.

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  • The situation is made even more complicated by the fact that belonging to a social group is more or less determined by others or self, and various interactions can occur between the possible self-attributions and external attributions. [1]


    Therefore, references to alleged communities and collective identities are perceived in some cases and respects as more repressive and in others as more emancipatory. Accordingly, on the one hand, Turkish migrants can refrain from being viewed only as "specimens" (and be it as "positive exceptions") of an externally defined and tendentially stigmatized population category. On the other hand, they may be able to insist on being recognized as a member of a social subgroup with their own identity, special experiences and cultural practices, without coming into conflict with themselves. But what is meant here by collective identity in detail? And what signs and characteristics of a collective identity can be found for Turkish migrants in Germany?