Snores a disease on its own

Clinical picture

snoring

Simple snoring is not harmful to health and usually does not require treatment. However, the increased breathing in the mouth can cause symptoms such as a dry mouth, sore throat or heartburn. However, there is also evidence of possible breathing disorders, including obstructive snoring and sleep apnea.

You should also consult a doctor if loud snoring wakes you up or disturbs the environment. Even if snoring occurs in any body position or you suspect that you have pauses in breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which can be manifested by daytime tiredness, morning headaches, difficulty concentrating or frequently recurring respiratory infections, you should have a doctor examined.

Obstructive snoring

Obstructive snoring, also called Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), is characterized by high airway resistance in the upper airways, whereby the sleep-fragmenting wake-up reactions are generated by the large pressure fluctuations in the chest and can also lead to daytime sleepiness. Obstructive snoring can be viewed as a precursor to obstructive sleep apnea. For this reason, the general rules of conduct listed in the "Therapy" chapter should be followed to prevent the symptoms from worsening.

Obstructive sleep apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by a blockage of the airways, whereby the air flow to the mouth and nose is completely stopped at least 5 times within an hour for more than ten seconds during sleep. With obstructive sleep apnea, the person concerned snores loudly, irregularly and with significant pauses in breathing. The waking reactions that occur due to the breathing pauses strongly disrupt the sleep of those affected. As a result, they are tired during the day, have difficulty concentrating and are often distracted or forgetful. Anxiety and depression are also common. In men, the nocturnal pauses in breathing often lead to potency problems. The classification of whether there is a mild, moderate or severe sleep disorder depends on how sleepy the person is during the day and how easily the person concerned falls asleep during the day. The doctor can determine the severity.

Central sleep apnea

Central sleep apnea is caused by stopping breathing movements due to slack breathing muscles in the chest area, whereby the air flow to the mouth and nose is completely stopped at least five times within an hour for more than ten seconds during sleep. The sequelae are the same as those of obstructive sleep apnea. In many cases there are mixed forms of obstructive and central apnea (so-called "mixed apnea").