How do you check a relay fuse

Check relay or its circuit?

Hi,

For the electronics cracks this will probably put a smile on your face,

but I ask anyway. :)

The following:

For several days now, I've been studying various circuit diagrams for specific circuits.

So far I was able to assign some relays and fuses which was actually the most difficult for me.

In my shortlist of the cause of the error, 3-4 relays and their associated fuses have come.

Now my actual 2 questions.

a: Can you, if I find an identical relay in the circuit,

replace the suspect with this one without hesitation to check

whether it is this relay?

b: The relay in the appendix could, with the ignition on,

bridge pins 4 and 8 on the relay socket to check that the circuit is intact?

Or is it even more complicated in the end, as I already thought. : D

Similar issues
35 answers

Yes!

1. You can use an identical relay and

2. You can connect pins 4 and 8 to check the function of the circle!

But only briefly! Do not connect permanently !!!

Hi,

Thank you very much wiessl123 for your turbo answer. :)

The people here are getting faster and faster. :)

I guess the "short" now refers to test 2, doesn't it?

Ok, it would only test for 4-5 seconds.

Thanks again.

Hi,

Well, thank you again.

And if no one has done it yet,

By the way, I welcome you to the forum. :)

if you build yourself a "bridge", put in a fuse according to the consumer. a flared relay socket is usually not that good for blood pressure ..

Hi omidoc,

Thanks, also to you first. :)

How do you mean ?

The fuse in the relay box that belongs to the relays that I want to bridge,

stay inside.

Do I have to install additional fuses there now?

Damn it, I almost thought it wasn't that easy again. : D

It depends on what you want to do exactly and how the circuit is protected ... and how skillfully you can use your hands ...

if you fumble around with your bridge, which probably consists of a line and two pins in the relay socket / fuse box, you make a mistake and the kl.87 e.g. put to ground, or put on another (wrong) pin ... this may not work out as well for one or the other component ...

Hi omidoc,

So I would like to briefly connect pins 4 and 8 in this case, pins 30 and 87,

which normally the bobbin would have to do.

Then the circuit would be closed and the current would continue to flow in the direction of the electric motor.

If the engine then starts it is due to the relay, if not, then continue studying. :)

The e-motor works, however, via a different relay circuit.

So in my opinion it can't be the engine.

The fuse for the circuit is OK.

Or what does it mean, how is the circuit protected?

Hi,

Yes, that's how I planned to connect pin 30 and pin 87.

This is the switch that normally closes when the coil is energized, which then picks up.

And thus passes the current on to the motor in my case.

Exactly. If your engine does not run then, it could only be due to the cable connection or the fuse. Or on the engine, but at least you know: if it is running, the relay or the cable in front of the relay is broken. If it does not run, everything behind / or with the relay.

But I wouldn't make it so complicated for myself to check.

Take a simple test lamp (better, of course, a multimeter), check whether current is arriving at the relay, and whether it goes off again. Then you know if it works.

Quote:

Originally written by Markus V2000

Exactly. If your engine does not run then, it could only be due to the cable connection or the fuse. Or on the engine, but at least you know: if it is running, the relay or the cable in front of the relay is broken. If it does not run, everything behind / or with the relay.

But I wouldn't make it so complicated for myself to check.

Take a simple test lamp (better, of course, a multimeter), check whether current is arriving at the relay, and whether it goes off again. Then you know if it works.

Hi,

OK thank you. then I understood the basic structure. :)

For one relay I would have found a replacement test relay in the circuit diagram,

only the other suspicious one, with the 2 integrated switches, is only available once.

Then I would have to check the bridge method or a multimeter.

What else I can think of.

With the relay with the 2 integrated switches, I see that correctly,

if only one coil is shown for the 2 switches,

that this then either closes or opens both switches or

just both switches are defective?

So that only one switch does not work (provided both switches get power in the supply line),

can not.

This is what the other looks like.

Of course, it is possible that only one pair of contacts is burned in it, has a high resistance or is stuck.

What are you doing on the fan control?

Hi Kurt,

You can't hide anything from you. : D

You got it again.

The following.

My 2 fans, M4 and M11, have recently stopped working with the air conditioning.

Normally, if I read the circuit diagram correctly, K 87 and K52 should be responsible for it.

Whereby if M4 receives power through K87, the power would have to be automatically passed through to M11 via K 52.

I've only been busy with the circuit diagrams for a week now.

Quite a bit of nonsense can come out of me.

But I try to understand.